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HomeMedichuMedicine Band Whitehouse Band

Medicine Band Whitehouse Band

The Medicine Band, a Canadian progressive rock group, was founded in 1999 by guitarist John
Whitehouse and drummer Casey Bork. The band’s lyrics have evolved over the years, from
themes of Nazi genocide, sexual violence, and serial killers to more recent explorations of
Dark NLP, metalanguage, and Scientology. Despite its eclectic and sometimes controversial
nature, Whitehouse continues to attract an eclectic and enthusiastic audience.
Casey Bork
Dr. Casey Bork was the founder of the Whitehouse Wind Symphony, a band with members from
all over Central New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania. Its growth has been rapid, drawing
experienced musicians from New Jersey, New York City, and eastern Pennsylvania. Today, the
band is composed of approximately 50 musicians and performs regularly to an enthusiastic
audience. He is also an active performer in the UCBOSS World Orchestra.
While studying music, Casey Bork, Sr. served as the supervisor of music at Roselle Public
Schools, where he also conducted the bands at Abraham Clark High School. He retired from
the school in 1978. He subsequently served as director of the Union County Band and
Orchestra Summer School, which he helped to create. VW Bork was a renowned music
educator who remained active in many organizations, including the Medicine Band and the
Whitehouse Band.
Peter Sotos
The band’s drummer Peter Sotos joined the group in 1985 and is known for his drum solos and
long audio collages. He was a prominent member of the band during their live performances
throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Before Sotos left the band, he began playing solo shows and
was credited with helping Whitehouse change the sound of their music. He was an important
member of the band and contributed to the sound of the band.
Sotos is a Chicago-based writer and performer. His music is controversial and often deals with
real-life criminals. His latest novel, “Selfish, Little,” explores the life of Lesley Ann Downey, a
child abuser. This work also challenges preconceptions about the rights of free speech and the
exploration of horror. Sotos’ work evokes a sense of depravity and violence.
During this time, Whitehouse reactivates. They record their new album at Steve Albini’s studio
in Chicago. Sotos becomes a good friend of Albini. The album, “Thank Your Lucky Stars,” is
released in 1990. In January 1992, Peter Sotos starts a new magazine called Parasite, which
he abandons after facing mail monitoring. In September 1995, the band starts recording
“Quality Time” and releases it in November.
The songs in Whitehouse have grown beyond the themes of Nazi genocide, serial killers, and
sexual violence. They are now infused with metalanguage and explorations of Scientology and
Dark NLP. And their music continues to be a vital part of many music-lovers’ soundtracks.
However, Whitehouse may be best characterized as a “noise band” in today’s neo-punk scene.
Paul Reuter
Known for their pseudo-transgressions, Paul Reuter and the Medicine Band Whitehouse Band
were a controversial group in the early eighties. Their album cover depicted a crucified rabbit,
a comment on the true meaning of Easter. The group’s live shows were also marked by a
raging audience, which the band would sometimes have to protect from. The Whitehouse band
has been consistently releasing albums since the mid-eighties.
The group reactivates in September 1987 and records a new album at Steve Albini’s Chicago
studio. Both Albini and Sotos become friends, and the album, Thank Your Lucky Stars, is
released in July 1990. A year later, the band plays its first live shows. The album has a
sombre tone, and the band begins work on their next album, Twice is not Enough.
Reuter was born in Kassel, Hesse, Germany in 1845. He used the name Joseph Josaphat
before converting to Christianity. Reuter then married Ida Maria Elizabeth Clementine Magnus

in November 1845. After his wedding, Reuter returned to Germany and joined a small
publishing company. Reuter was interested in Gauss’ experiments with electric telegraphy and
considered ways to use the technology to improve communication throughout the world.
The Medicine-Band influenced many industrial and noise acts of the late eighties. Their sound
was influenced by the sounds of Alvin Lucier, Robert Ashley, and Marquis de Sade. In addition
to their industrial sound, they created music that blended high and low frequencies with
vocals. Although the group was not commercially successful, they remain a vital part of the
underground music scene. The band’s music continues to influence the sound of many other
bands.
Asceticists 2006
The eighth studio album from Medicine band Whitehouse Band, Asceticists 2006, is an
interesting mix of experimental noise rock and Americana. The band originally released
Asceticists 2006 in 2006 through Susan Lawly and reissued the album on vinyl in October of
the same year. The album is filled with eerie songs that are reminiscent of the band’s earlier
work, such as “Always On My Mind.”
The sound on Asceticists (2006) continues the African vibe from Bird Seed. The cover features
three colors, and the CD label contains a voodoo veve. Throughout the album, you’ll hear
random tribal percussion thrown in for good measure. The album is surprisingly catchy,
though, and should appeal to fans of Einsturzende Neubauten and The Fall.
In March 1981, Whitehouse releases the second single from their fifth album, “Like a Crab”,
which spawns a new wave of popularity. In October of the same year, they play their first live
show, in Belfast. The band cancels all live actions and release their sixth studio album, “Twice
is Not Enough.”
Peter Sotos, who was arrested in the mid-80s on suspicion of obscenity, was a member of
Whitehouse for a while. Although he had recently returned from prison, his absence from the
band was reported as a result of his conversion to Christianity. The singer reportedly left the
band in 2002. He cited differences in lifestyle attitudes as his reason for leaving the group.
Asceticists is the sixth studio album by Whitehouse Band and is the band’s most diverse. The
lyrics are often dark and hilarious and highlight child abuse. The songs are often loaded with
pop culture references and bizarre jokes. While the album’s themes are dark and violent, it is
incredibly enjoyable to listen to. For those who enjoy experimental noise, Asceticists may be
just what you’re looking for.
Sutcliffe Jugend
A sonic offshoot of Whitehouse, Sutcliffe Jugend is an extreme power electronics act that
combines harsh guitars and synthesizers. Formed in early 1982, the group gained notoriety for
its raw and uncompromising power electronics. After a hiatus in the mid-80s, the band
resumed full-time in 1995. They were featured on Redemption TV and released a live album
called Live Assault.
Founded in 1982, Sutcliffe Jugend has worked with a revolving cast of collaborators over the
years. They include Per Najbjerg Odderskov, Kevin Tomkins, Glen Wallis, David Tibet, Peter
Sotos, and Trevor Brown. Although the group has been involved in a wide range of projects, it
has remained a core idea that’s rooted in Bennett’s vision.
While the group’s third album does not sound as different as their previous two releases, it
does take their approach a bit further. The band uses piercing treble to contrast with low
drones. The band also makes use of oscillating shrieks that may have been mic feedback. In
some songs, the entire band’s sound shifts to treble, with a high-pitched synth kicking in at the
end.
Though there is a certain ‘ghost’ element to Early Whitehouse, there are more overt elements
to the sound. This album is similarly odd and anti-musical. The textures of the music are noisy
and unpleasant. The sounds are similar to angry massage chairs. The album’s clearest hint of
what’s to come is “Mindphaser,” which features Bennett’s corny attempt at hypnosis.

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